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Post by simplypotterheads (via trollinthekitchen)
April 19, 2014 at 4:01 AM | Post Permalink | 3,720 notes

allyou-needis-klaine:

helloimcaptainjack:

endlessmeg:

finepieceofcas:

multiple-stuff:

deathlydraco:

#just noticed the slytherin girl and gryffindor boy #theyre so excited #and he turns back to her #and shes like yeah i know #and sort of grabs hold of him #and new otp/brotp #defying labels #not everyone hated slytherins #not all slytherins were dicks #i like this

why is one kid not wearing a robe

the kids who are wearing robes were taking their OWLs/NEWTs.  Notice Luna’s not wearing a robe either.  Because they’re underclassmen and had free periods while the upperclassmen were taking their exams.

This post is amazing because a) Slytherin and intrahouse love, but also because b) someone just explained how free-dress works during exams at Hogwarts. 

we take our harry potter very seriously here at tumblr dot com

Harry Potter is a very serious topic

allyou-needis-klaine:

helloimcaptainjack:

endlessmeg:

finepieceofcas:

multiple-stuff:

deathlydraco:

#just noticed the slytherin girl and gryffindor boy #theyre so excited #and he turns back to her #and shes like yeah i know #and sort of grabs hold of him #and new otp/brotp #defying labels #not everyone hated slytherins #not all slytherins were dicks #i like this

why is one kid not wearing a robe

the kids who are wearing robes were taking their OWLs/NEWTs.  Notice Luna’s not wearing a robe either.  Because they’re underclassmen and had free periods while the upperclassmen were taking their exams.

This post is amazing because a) Slytherin and intrahouse love, but also because b) someone just explained how free-dress works during exams at Hogwarts. 

we take our harry potter very seriously here at tumblr dot com

Harry Potter is a very serious topic

(Source: s-o-m-e--thing)

Post by s-o-m-e--thing (via darkseraphim28)
April 18, 2014 at 9:55 PM | Post Permalink | 179,791 notes

Post by forharmony (via fuckyeahharrypotter)
March 30, 2013 at 8:06 PM | Post Permalink | 215,253 notes

(Source: dmalfo-y)

Post by dmalfo-y (via karengilan)
March 30, 2013 at 8:04 PM | Post Permalink | 11,703 notes

(Source: ronniepotter)

Post by ronniepotter (via themelissabrooks)
March 14, 2013 at 12:27 AM | Post Permalink | 142 notes

mandycreates:

kethera:

coconutcoconutcoconut:

youneedmeoryourenothing:

#actors who are actually their character

the greatest casting ever.

Even better when you think about how Dan got a place for himself in NY to continue his career, Emma went to a school in USA, and Rupert bought a fucking ice cream truck.

Follow your dreams Rupert

I didn’t know this. So I looked it up and - HE ACTUALLY DID.image

‘I keep my van well stocked. It’s got a proper machine that dispenses Mr Whippy ice cream and I buy my lollies wholesale – 50 for a tenner – so I never run short.

I’m not allowed to sell my merchandise. I’d need a licence for that. ‘I tend to avoid July and August, but the rest of the year I’ll drive around the local villages and if I see some kids looking like they’re in need of ice creams, I’ll pull over and dish them out for free. They’ll say, “Ain’t you Ron Weasley?” And I’ll say, “It’s strange, I get asked that a lot.”

It makes it even better that he just GIVES the icecream away. [Source]

(Source: mygeekself)

Post by mygeekself (via crosscjr)
March 1, 2013 at 2:04 AM | Post Permalink | 938,983 notes

(Source: mer-ow)

Post by mer-ow (via stickdip)
February 14, 2013 at 8:06 AM | Post Permalink | 183,088 notes

Post by darkflights (via karengilan)
February 10, 2013 at 8:54 PM | Post Permalink | 10,399 notes

The Magic Begins: [16/30] Favourite Scenery/Locations.

Post by ohlumos (via stickdip)
February 10, 2013 at 8:48 PM | Post Permalink | 15,282 notes

theredanemone:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

 Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded



If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?
It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.
In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.
“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.
What does this mean?
In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.
However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.
These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.
In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.
This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:
How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?
Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.
How can a squib be born to wizard parents?
Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.
How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?
The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.
You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.




Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.



don’t you just love it when nerds go to college?

theredanemone:

grantaire-put-that-bottle-down:

ihititwithmyaxe:

mothernaturenetwork:

Harry Potter wizarding genetics decoded

If the wizarding gene is dominant, as J.K. Rowling says in her famous series of Harry Potter books, then how can a wizard be born to muggle parents (non-magical people)? And how can there be squibs (non-magical people born into wizarding lines)?

It seems these baffling genetic questions have finally been answered, thanks to Andrea Klenotiz, a biology student at the University of Delaware.

In a six-page paper, which she sent to Rowling, Klenotiz outlines how the wizarding gene works and even explains why some witches and wizards are more powerful than others.

“Magical ability could be explained by a single autosomal dominant gene if it is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats with non-Mendelian ratios of inheritance,” Klenotiz explains.

What does this mean?

In school we learn the fundamentals of genetics by studying Gregory Mendel’s pea plant experiments and completing basic Punnett squares. Basically, we’re taught that whenever one copy of a gene linked to a dominant trait is present, then the offspring will exhibit that dominant trait, regardless of the other gene.

However, Non-Mendelian genes don’t follow this rule, which is the basis of Klenotiz’s argument. She says that the wizarding gene could be explained if it’s caused by a trinucleotide repeat, which is the repetition of three nucleotides — the building blocks of DNA — multiple times.

These repeats can be found in normal genes, but sometimes many more copies of this repeated code can appear in genes than is standard, causing a mutation. This kind of mutation is responsible for genetic diseases like Huntington’s Disease. Depending upon how many of these repeats occur in the genes, a person could exhibit no symptoms, could have a mild form of the disease or could have a severe form of it.

In her paper, Klenotiz argues that eggs with high levels of these repeats are more likely to be fertilized, a phenomenon known as transmission ratio distortion. She also suggests that the egg or sperm with high levels of repeats is less likely to be created or to survive in the wizarding womb.

This argument answers several questions about wizarding genetics:

How can a wizard be born to muggle parents?

Genetic mutations can randomly appear, meaning anyone could be born with the wizarding gene. However, there’s a better chance of magical offspring occurring if the parents are on the high side of the normal range for mutations.

How can a squib be born to wizard parents?

Although parents with these mutated magical genes would be likely to pass the gene on to their children, there’s still a possibility that any given offspring might not inherit the trinucleotide repeat.

How can varying degrees of magical ability be explained?

The more repeats a wizard inherits, the stronger the magical power he or she will have. If both wizarding parents are powerful wizards, it’s likely their offspring will also be powerful.

You can read Klenotiz’s full paper on wizarding genetics here.

Far and away one of the nerdiest things I’ve ever read. Love it.

image


don’t you just love it when nerds go to college?

Post by mothernaturenetwork (via sheakoshan)
January 26, 2013 at 6:20 PM | Post Permalink | 87,936 notes

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